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Fitting a wood burner through the wall

Installing/fitting a wood burner through the wall

installing a wood burner through the wall

You are here because you wish to connect your stove to a flexible chimney liner but you are NOT inserting your stove into a fireplace recess (builder’s opening).

First of all I must say that I have only installed a stove this way on two occasions and I do not have many pictures. You will have to make a larger hole in the wall than I did or have another hole on the other side of the chimney (we had access to the outside wall of the property).

Note that the flexible liner must stay within the confines of the chimney.

free standing stove through wallLet’s look at one my scribbles. From the top down you have liner, adaptor, vitreous 45 degree steel elbow, length of straight vitreous, another vitreous 45 elbow with a soot door to assist the sweep and at least 600mm of vertical that slots into the collar of your stove (sealed with fire cement).

Your soot door can be in the vertical pipe OR the elbow.

You may come off the rear of the stove with a T-piece or manufacturer’s 45 degree rear connection (if the manufacturer offers such).

The “long nose adaptor with bolts” connects to the liner with three bolts and is self explanatory when you see it (some you need to self tapper to the liner but I like the bolt versions). You need to add fire cement in the small gap between the adaptor and the liner.

rear exit stove pipeYou can cut steel vitreous flue pipe. I use an angle grinder with a very thin metal cutting blade of approx. 1-1.5mm thickness. Make sure you wear long sleeves, eye protection, dust mask and gloves. Please take this very seriously the thin blades can shatter.

YOU CAN ONLY CUT THE FEMALE END OF ANY VITREOUS STEEL PIPE (THE TOP OF EACH PIECE). I use masking tape to get a perfect line and then carefully cut all the way round.

If you slide a vitreous steel elbow onto your long nose adaptor watch it does not protrude too far into the elbow as it will block off part of the pipe’s diameter.

wood stove off the back

This rule is why you can never go horizontally straight through the wall into your chimney.

I have always refused to cut gloss stove pipe (expensive and may chip).

Your first task will be to open up a hole in your chimney breast using a hammer drill on chisel function. The hole needs to be at a sufficient height to ensure your stove plus a minimum 600mm stove pipe can be acommodated. One way to do this is actually to set up your stove as a practice run. You can use a spirit level with a 45 degree setting to get your flue pipe angle.

I would also open up a second hole near to the ground – you can use this to remove any soot after your chimney has been swept. A sweep will use your new hole to sweep your chimney (you must sweep the chimney before inserting a liner see CHIMNEYS AND LINERS).

You will use your upper hole to connect your adaptor to your liner and your first elbow to your adaptor (with a couple of self tappers. Then you will add your next piece of steel vitreous and so on (using self tappers to connect each). Make sure any self tappers do not protrude into the flue mure than 5mm so as not to hinder the sweep’s brushes.

flue pipe through wallI would advise making all your connections BEFORE filling up your hole otherwise you might find that the lack of movement in the 45 degree pipe/liner make continuing difficult if not impossible.

The picture on the left shows vitreous pipe passing through a hole in the wall. Your hole will be a lot larger than ths (we had access to a hole in the outside wall in this case to connect our liner). Note that I have protected the flue pipe with fireproof webbing (sticky back). You can also use fire rope but you’ll use a lot of it.

This is in place because the pipe will expand and contract with heat and either damage itself or break down the mortar around it (I have seen many done like this without protection).

You can then mortar up the hole and stick your rosette to the wall (using thin lines of Silicon).









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